PR Professionals SHOULD Break Social Media Taboos

Thinkstock Photos I recently came across an article on Mashable and it got me thinking: a lot of the self-absorbed social media behavior we are guilty of is exactly what we do as PR professionals. Such as:

1. Stalking your ex’s new partner.

Let’s be real - we all do it. Thankfully, unlike LinkedIn, Facebook doesn’t tell you who has viewed your profile.

While it’s human nature to analyze the competition, it’s generally frowned upon when it comes to late-night stalking. In PR it’s different. It’s our job to know the competition and one of the best ways to analyze our clients’ competitors is through social media.

2. Checking to see how many people have liked or commented on your status updates.

We all like to feel special and know that people are interested in our lives - perhaps that’s why we incessantly check to see how many birthday posts we’ve received or how many likes we’ve gotten on a photo. If you manage the PR program for one of your clients, then you’ll find yourself doing this everyday.

Social media is a powerful PR channel and it’s important to make sure social posts are resonating with the key audience. A great way to know if a post is working or not is by looking at the post’s engagement. Similar to A/B testing, you can see what posts work best and model your future posts around what was successful in the past.

3. Bragging about yourself.

Everyone’s been guilty of excessive online gloating at some point. Social media bragging is often looked down upon, but less so for companies. PR professionals rely on social media to promote company news, accolades and momentum; it helps continue the lifecycle of content. Best-case scenario? The brags news goes viral.

4. Looking at photos of everyone hanging out without you.

Nobody likes to feel left out, and it’s never fun to see pictures from an awesome event that you missed out on. The same goes for PR. Let’s say you saw photos from a recent industry event featuring representatives from all your client’s competitors. That probably tells you one key thing: your client should have been there too.

So what have we learned here? Basically, we’ve all committed some kind of self-absorbed behavior on social media whether we like to admit it or not, but PR professionals actually get paid for it.